There’s that sign again.

Banner and Bummer

First, take note of the last photo affiliated with this story.  That is the GP banner popping up at various protests, marches, and rallies in the metro area.  Second, recognize the antagonism between the governor of one corporate party and the state legislature, both houses with majorities of the other corporate party, unveiled in the article.  That is the other sign to note:  a putative two-party system that leads to bickering instead of co-operation.  Minor parties can lead the way to more representative governance.  If no party holds a strong enough majority, it is forced to work with other parties to get the work of governing done.  The breadth of the populace getting representation is greater.  Alliances may change from one issue to another, but more meaningful dialogue may occur and reinforce the notion of service in public service.  In a two-party system, the corporate parties simply take their turns at the trough.  The Green Party is the party for people, planet, and peace.

Advertisements

Green Party Caucuses

Hello Greens.  The Green Party of the United States is a federation of state parties.  Participation at the national level, as a member of the National Committee or one of the many standing committees, requires approval by one’s state party.  The identity caucuses, however, do not.  The Women’s Caucus, the Black Caucus, the Latinx Caucus, the Lavender Caucus, and the Youth Caucus all exist to assure that the Green Party is diverse and hears historically underrepresented voices.

If you are so inclined, learn more about these opportunities to participate in the Green Party.

Having Our Say

Here are two examples of Greens speaking (or writing) to people and to power.  The first is an excerpt from the guest column by B. Burris written late last year for the Albuquerque Journal.

Neoconservatives and the military-industrial complex are eagerly supporting Clinton over Trump in anticipation of a return to the more aggressive foreign policy orientation of George W. Bush.

Some say, “Well, we have to vote for the lesser of the two evils.” I myself have voted in this way much of my life. However, although lesser-evil voting seems to make sense in the short run, when one looks at the effect over time, its problems become clear.

Repeatedly voting for the perceived lesser evil lowers standards and creates a “race to the bottom.” By voting for candidates who do not share our values just because they seem better than the opposing candidate, we have given carte blanche to party elites to choose the nominee. As a result, both parties have moved to the right in recent decades: the Republicans to the far right and the Democrats to the center right. Both parties are increasingly influenced by corporate donors and the military-industrial complex.

I have decided to say “enough is enough” and reject both of the corrupt and undemocratic political parties.

I am working with others to build a progressive alternative by supporting the Green Party and their presidential ticket of Jill Stein and Ajamu Baraka. The Green Party is an international party with parties in almost 90 countries.

Green parties have been particularly influential in Western Europe and Scandinavia, where they work for environmental and social democratic policies. The German Green Party, founded in 1980, has participated in coalition governments for many years.

Green parties have been at the forefront of raising environmental concerns and addressing climate change, but they also prioritize social justice, grass-roots democracy and nonviolence/peace. To learn more about Green party politics, you can find its U.S. platform at gp.org/platform. It is a detailed and excellent platform.

Whomever you vote for on Nov. 8, I would encourage you to vote based on your values rather than your fears. The more that we vote out of fear, the more fearful our world becomes. The more that we disregard our values, the more corrupt and amoral our society becomes. Vote not for the lesser evil but rather for the greater good.

The following image is the recently published letter by P. Rogers taking on the state legislature for failing to curb predatory lenders.

pred_lend

Amazing Crowd

A small group of us were stationed at the SE corner of Civic Plaza in ABQ on Saturday, January 21st for the Women’s March on Washington Rally that attracted thousands of people.  We had good visibility with lots of interaction with people.  People borrowed some of our signs for the rally, and we distributed a lot of green safety pins and several buttons.  Many people stopped to photograph the big banner and other signs.

Please try to join us this Saturday evening at 6:00 p. m. at the Guild Cinema on Central Avenue in Nob Hill for flyer distribution and a viewing of Antarctica: Ice and Sky.

New Year, Renewed Effort

The Green Party of the Albu(r)querque Metropolitan Area (GPAMA) is carrying the momentum from the 2016 Stein/Baraka campaign into 2017.  We started an events-list that is e-mailed to our list advising area Greens of various events or activities related to the Four Pillars and 10 Key Values.

Beginning on the winter solstice, we joined the silent march and attended the vigil in memory of those individuals who passed away in 2016 who had experienced homelessness.

A few of us gathered to make signs to display at the upcoming Women’s March on Washington Rally in ABQ.  Some were put into use the very next day at a healthcare rally and demonstration in front of UNMH.  Greens were there calling (literally) for a single-payer system and exposing the corporate parties.  See some of the signs on our home page and join us at Civic Plaza on Saturday, January 21, 2017, at 11:00 a. m.